Good-bye, Dubai

Today I was supposed to fly back to Dubai to prepare for Fall term. Instead, I sat in a classroom in Tennessee, preparing to be an adjunct once again.

This is not a post I thought I would be writing today.

But this is life, and life gets messy.

I was not planning on leaving, and I feel as if my time in the Middle East has come to an untimely end. It was my choice, a professional matter that I choose not to discuss publicly, as there’s definitely an element of “I say/they say” involved. Both sides got entrenched in their sides, and for the first time in my life I broke a contract and left a job.

I will miss my colleagues in English terribly. I will miss my dean, probably the best dean I’ve ever worked with, and that’s saying a lot. He tried very hard to convince me to change my mind and almost had me convinced. I will miss many wonderful colleagues in other departments, too. I worked with some amazing folks.

I will miss most of my students terribly, as well. I think some will miss me. I think some may be hurt that I left as they’d signed up for my classes, but there was going to be a schedule shuffle anyway, so c’est la vie.

I will miss living in the desert in a multi-cultural, accepting city. I liked the UAE very much. Some day I hope to go back to the region and spend more time there, but for now, I’m in the US.

As a person who likes to make the best of things, I can say I’m glad I’ll be able to be here for my family. Folks need me, so here I am.

I was blessed in finding adjunct work to tide me over the next year. I’ve already met some interesting colleagues, and it will be a new adventure–I’ve never lived in the American South before, never taught this demographic.

For the past few weeks I’ve wondered what I would say here. I didn’t get a chance to say good-bye to so many great people, but I thought at least I should say a good-bye to the many folks who have been following my adventure on-line. I needed to close this blog properly.  Maybe some day it will be active again, “adventures in xxx,” but for now, it’s good-bye.

I haven’t decided yet if I’m going to restart The Broad is Back, my blog about being a former ex-pat. The US hasn’t changed much in the year I’ve been gone, but coming back was difficult. I like being an ex=pat.

This is much harder to write than I expected, so for now, let me just say thank you for having joined me on a wonderful adventure. I learned and experienced so much. I met warm, intelligent, kind people and got to deepen my appreciation of Arab culture.

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Serendipity

I made a flying visit through New York City, mostly to see a dear friend from grad school and then The Seeing Place Theater’s double bill, Boys’ Life and Boy Meets Girl. Today (this was written July 18th, and I’ve been too busy to post) I’m taking Metro-North to my best friend’s. She and I are going to travel together to Tennessee where my mother is living. Bestie and I met in kindergarten and have been friends ever since, so she’s known my mother almost as long as I have.

The beauty that is Bay Ridge, Brooklyn

The beauty that is Bay Ridge, Brooklyn

I was a bit early for my train, so I was taking some quick snaps of Grand Central Station, my absolute favorite building in New York City. A young man chuckled, at me I thought, so I told him that it was my favorite place. He said his was The National History Museum, and he hadn’t been laughing at me, but at a video he was watching. This struck up a conversation that was an absolute delight.

Grand Central Station

Grand Central Station

I'm glad I had a chance to be in my favorite building

I’m glad I had a chance to be in my favorite building

He’s a young man, my son’s age, who just started working for Metro-North a few months ago. He asked me some questions about the ceiling paintings, and then we had a free-ranging conversation about the history of New York City and Ireland. He’s a history buff, born and reared in the city, whose parents came here in the 70s from Puerto Rico.

He knew more about New York City’s history than many people I know twice his age, and he was eager to learn more. We only spoke for 20 minutes—he had just gotten off his shift and I was making a train—but we both walked away from the encounter enriched and happier.

23 Skidoo!! The Flatiron.

23 Skidoo!! The Flatiron.

He told me, with what seemed like the utmost sincerity, that he had wanted to work for either Metro-North or the MTA because they were integral to both the growth and the history of New York City. He wanted to be part of that tradition.

He gave me hope for the future of this city I love in spite of myself.

The NYPL Lions. Second favorite place in NYC

The NYPL Lions. Second favorite place in NYC

Most of my more recent ancestors are from New York City, with some arriving as early as 1850 with the “latest” arrival in 1883. We’ve been here a long time. This city is in my blood on a cellular level. My son was born here. Thanks to my parents, I was born in Westchester County, but my roots in the city are deep and strong. I’ve lived and worked in New York for many years.

So much beauty

So much beauty

I’ve not been happy with the direction the city has been taking. It’s rapidly becoming a place where true middle class people can no longer afford to live, much less the working class people who build, maintain and care for this place. I thought for sure when I left this time I was done with it for good.

This flying visit has proved to me that the city is still in me. There is a pull that I feel that binds me to this place, even though I despair of ever being able to live here again.

And while being with friends and family is great, that young man has become an indelible memory for me. I wish him a long, happy and healthy life with thanks for making a jaded New Yorker happy.

 

 

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THe Last Real Day of Holiday in the UK

July 13, 2015

Sitting at the gate at Heathrow, waiting for my flight to Zurich. A roundabout way to go home, but my employer books the tickets.

Didn’t get a chance to write last night because it was a busy day, and then I needed to be up at 4:30 this morning to get out and dressed and to the airport for an early flight.

It was a day spent mostly on the river. I’d never traveled the Thames before. I had decided I wanted to see something in Greenwich, and then the boat idea fell into place. A 10-minute walk got me to the dock at the I Eye and then I was off. Traveling by boat isn’t as efficient as traveling by tube, but there’s nothing to see by ads and people in the tube. Over water, there’s a glorious view of London.

City views

City views

On the boat from Waterloo to Greenwich, a Thames boatman gave us a running commentary. He warned us that he would make things up, so I don’t take anything he says as gospel, though I do know that he gave us the proper names of the buildings, at least. And of the history he told that I know, he was correct, so I suspect there wasn’t really that much lying. But after hearing the whoppers the tour guide in Edinburgh was telling, I’m sure he slipped in something.

Britain's oldest pub still in operation

Britain’s oldest pub still in operation

The ride to Greenwich took about 40 minutes. It was a bit nippy at times, and while I’d brought my rain hat, I’d not brought my jacket. I probably could have used it, but such is life.

Cleopatra's Needle guarded by two sphinxes. Gifted to the UK by Egypt. Its companion is in NYC's Central Park

Cleopatra’s Needle guarded by two sphinxes. Gifted to the UK by Egypt. Its companion is in NYC’s Central Park

Former site of a UNIT Base, as every Doctor Who Fan knows. Destroyed in the Battle of Canary Wharf :)

Former site of a UNIT Base, as every Doctor Who Fan knows. Destroyed in the Battle of Canary Wharf 🙂

I was heading to Greenwich to see the Fan Museum. Yes, there is such a thing! It’s in an old Georgian townhouse that’s been renovated to its full period glory. I’d never been to Greenwich before, either. I did see the outside of the Cutty Sark, the world’s fasted tea clipper, but for £13, I decided to forego taking a look inside. I’ve been on a number of historic ships in the US, so I thought I’d save the money.

Close up

Close up

The entire ship

The entire ship

Walking to find the museum, I stumbled across St. Alfege Parish Church. I’d never heard of such a saint, but the churchyard was interesting.

Grave stones

Grave stones

After missing my turn (thanks to my interest in the church), I made my way toward the fan museum. On the way, a blue historic marker caught my eye. It was on the former home of the Poet Laureate C. Day-Lewis, whose poetry I admire greatly, so that was a nice surprise. He lived about four doors down from the museum.

You should read some of his poetry. Out of vogue, but I love it. And his detective novels written as Nicholas Blake are a joy.

You should read some of his poetry. Out of vogue, but I love it. And his detective novels written as Nicholas Blake are a joy.

I learned about the fan museum in an article about great teas around London. I had planned to have tea there, but my email for a reservation didn’t get through. I thought, “fans are nice—I’ll go!” I am glad that I went, and after an initial disappointment about the tea, I realized that I didn’t really want to eat all those heavy carbs anyway. I’d never actually ordered a cream tea, so I was going to try it. Upon reflection, a lunch of cake didn’t actually appeal.

The Fan Museum

The Fan Museum

The fans were gorgeous, so I’m happy I went.

A display case

A display case

Some of my favorite flowers

Some of my favorite flowers

When I left the museum, I saw a sign for Our Lady Star of the Sea Church further up the hill, so up I went. I’ve only ever seen one other Star of the Sea Church, and that was in rural western Ireland and was an old fisherman’s church. Star of the Sea is yet another patron for me, as the Latin version of my name means pearl, and pearls are known as, you’ve got it, the stars of the sea. It was a Roman Catholic church and actually not that old. I took a look at the outside, then head back down the hill.

Our Lady Star of the Sea

Our Lady Star of the Sea

Before I got back on the boat, I took a quick look at the grounds of the Royal Naval College. By this point in my trip, I was museum and monumented out, so I didn’t go look at much at all. It was designed, in part, by Sir Christopher Wren, the man who designed St. Paul’s Cathedral and helped design much of London after the Great Fire. As the fire happened smack dab in the middle of my historical period, Wren is someone I’m familiar with. This was a theme this trip, for sure.

The Royal Naval College, whose domes were a prototype for St. Paul's

The Royal Naval College, whose domes were a prototype for St. Paul’s

I very much enjoyed the trip back. I sat on the other side of the boat and took my fill of pictures. Although it was mostly overcast, I realized this morning that I managed to get a bit of a sunburn. Not a painful one, but what would have been tan on someone with less fair skin became a pale rose on me. Technically a burn.

Sir Walter Raleigh on the college grounds

Sir Walter Raleigh on the college grounds

Tower Bridge

Tower Bridge

I needed to get home in order to change for I had tickets for The Globe Theatre, which has no roof! It was raining and getting chilly, so I wanted to change into khakis and grab my rain jacket. I’d been to the Globe before, in 1997, so I was looking forward to going again. Last night’s play was Richard II, which is full of beautiful poetry.

The setting

The setting

In spite of the drizzle, it was a sublime experience. Richard’s fall never ceases to move me. As it was the Globe, the performances were brilliant, the staging impeccable, the spectacle downright Elizabethan.

Inside the Globe

Inside the Globe

Period decoration in the boxes

Period decoration in the boxes

Then it was early to bed as I had to be up to make the train to the plane.

Summary reflections another day. Just some pictures to sum it all up.

HMS Belfast, now a floating museum

HMS Belfast, now a floating museum

Replica of Raleigh's The Golden Hind, which is raising funds for a new voyage.

Replica of Raleigh’s The Golden Hind, which is raising funds for a new voyage.

Greenwich streets

Greenwich streets

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Day Out in London

July 11, 2015

Taking a short break with a cuppa before I head out to the theatre to report on a very full day.

I woke up to what sounded like someone outside my window. As I’m on the fourth floor and face a busy street, I thought this unlikely. Prying one eye open, I realized that it was the window washer. Luckily the curtains were closed, but it surely woke me up!

I walked from where I’m staying to Westminster Bridge, on my way to Westminster Abbey.

New London icon

New London icon

Old London icon

Old London icon

The admission price is quite steep, £20, but there were two graves I especially wanted to see. Of course, the Abbey is a magnificent building for its religious and historic significance as well as the sheer volume of art in contains in the shape of monuments. I took my time and saw many of the monuments, testing the limits of my next to nil Latin. Luckily, I can do daughter of, wife of, dates and titles, so I could figure things out. I foolishly forgot to get a guided audio. Don’t know what I was thinking. No pictures allowed, but a magnificent building.

External Abbey decorations

External Abbey decorations

Boadicea, the native queen who led an uprising against the invading Romans. In the chariot with her daughters.

Boadicea, the native queen who led an uprising against the invading Romans. In the chariot with her daughters.

I was there for two graves: Aphra Behn and Anne Oldfield. Behn, who died in 1689, is one of the writers I wrote about in my doctoral dissertation. I teach her work and adore her. She’s my role model, and a role model for all women who write, as Virginia Woolf famously declared in her lecture that became a book, A Room of One’s Own. In it, she said, “All women together ought to let flowers fall upon the tomb of Aphra Behn which is, most scandalously but rather appropriately, in Westminster Abbey, for it was she who earned them the right to speak their minds.”

I am such a geek that I actually wrote to the Abbey and asked if I could bring flowers. They never answered me, so I took that as a no.

She’s not in the Abbey proper but in the Cloisters, where people were taking photos, so I took a quick one. She’s on the pathway, so people walk on her grave without noticing, which is the same for many famous and worthy folk, so I’m not complaining. The inscription, written by her erstwhile lover, John Hoyle, reads “Here lies a Proof that Wit can never be Defence enough against Mortality.”

Behn's grave

Behn’s grave

I sat a minute and said a few words to her.

From the other side of the aisle

From the other side of the aisle

In the nave is the small stone marking the grave of actress Anne Oldfield who died in 1730. I talked about her in the paper I just presented yesterday, so I stopped and said hello to her, as well. She’s in the church proper, so no photo, but her marker is a small square with her name.

The Abbey is an amazing place, and I’m glad I went.

Next door is St. Margaret’s Church, The House of Common’s Church. That’s free, with a suggested donation to keep the doors open, and it has a gorgeous stained glass window that was a gift to Henry VIII and Katharine of Aragon from around 1520. I’m so glad it survived the Puritans and the Luftwaffe. St Margaret’s was bombed during the war and many monuments were damaged. The Abbey was hit, too, quite badly, though many of the moveable treasures had been moved and the rest sandbagged to spare them.

St. Margaret’s also has memorials to Sir Walter Raleigh and the brilliant poet John Milton. He and I don’t agree on much in terms of religion, but I admire the man and his art.

I was meeting someone for lunch, but had some time, so I popped into the National Portrait Gallery to revisit some of my favorites. And as it’s been almost 40 years since I’d last been (I can’t believe I just typed that number), some folks I now know an awful lot about who were strangers to the 16 year old who last visited.

My favorite painting of a favorite poet, John Donne. I was thrilled to see it. I didn't know it was in the Gallery. Mesmerizing in person.

My favorite painting of a favorite poet, John Donne. I was thrilled to see it. I didn’t know it was in the Gallery. Mesmerizing in person.

Most of my visit was in the Tudor, Stuart and early Georgian galleries, but I did pop by to see the portrait of the Duchess of Cambridge that was unveiled a few years ago . It got mixed reviews, though she publically said she loved it. Her eyes are a lovely moss green in it, but other than that, I was unimpressed. The portrait of Dame Maggie Smith is brilliant, though.

Across the street from the National Portrait Gallery is St. Martin’s-in-the-Fields Church, which has the Café in the Crypt, which is just what it sounds like: the crypt of the church has been turned into a café. I’d read about it and decided I had to go, so when I knew I would be able to meet a favorite former student, I asked if she could join me there. I taught her 20 years ago this year, and now she has a cutie patootie two year old. They both came in to meet me, and we had an absolutely delicious lunch and joyful visit. We only got to spend a little over three hours together, but it was a great.

The church itself

The church itself

If you ever go to London, do visit the Café in the Crypt. The food was reasonable, plentiful and tasted “homemade,” that is if you happen to have someone at home who is a really good cook.

The roof of the crypt

The roof of the crypt

After we said goodbye at Waterloo Station, I had a short while to collect my thoughts and change to go to the theatre. That’s when I started this entry. At the National Theatre I saw George Farquhar’s 1707 play The Beaux’ Stratagem, considered the last of the bawdier Restoration comedies. I’ve read it multiple time, of course, so I was thrilled to get a chance to see it while I’m in London, and it gives a nice Restoration touch to my very “Long 18th Century” holiday.

I saw this on my walk and wanted to share for the women.

I saw this on my walk and wanted to share for the women.

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Conferencing–But mostly pretty pictures!

July 10, 2015 Conferencing

Spent the past two days attending the scholarly conference “Actress as Author: Nell Gwynn to Ellen Terry” at Chawton House Library, a center for the study of women’s literature as well as being the former home of Edward Knight, Jane Austen’s brother.

Chawton House Library

Chawton House Library

The setting was absolutely stunning, of course, but the papers were brilliant—overwhelming, really. I started my academic career as a Restoration scholar, but for nearly 20 years I’ve gotten away from it. I haven’t had the opportunity to teach in my field, so my interests drifted, and I’ve mostly written about and attended conferences on online pedagogy. I dipped my toe back in the conference circuit in January, but even that paper was about pedagogy, as well.

In the past year, I made a conscious decision to go back to my first love. The paper I gave was the first paper I’ve written on the subject since 1999, so a lot has changed during that time. Listening to all the speakers, I was blown away by the quality of the scholarship represented. It was nerve-wracking and even a bit overwhelming. I admit, I ended up cutting out a little early as I was cramming so much information into my head that I couldn’t hold any more. I went for a walk, and ended up walking right to the train station.

I partially regret that decision now, as I’m missing out on two speakers I very much wanted to hear, but I do think it was the right decision.

Too many thoughts were going through my head—too many ideas were vying for attention and time, and I need time to sort things out.

Chawton House Library is in the village of Chawton, which also has the home Jane Austen lived in till shortly before the end of her life.

Jane Austen's former home where she wrote many of her novels.

Jane Austen’s former home where she wrote many of her novels.

Lest we forget! Everything is very clearly marked, including Austen's favorite walks.

Lest we forget! Everything is very clearly marked, including Austen’s favorite walks.

I’d been to the house before, back in 1997, and the village itself is absolutely what one would expect from a village so strongly associated with Jane Austen—narrow streets, thatched cottages and a beautiful view of the surrounding farm lands.

A thatched roof cottage

A thatched roof cottage

A homeowner with a sense of humor. This is a small statue of a cat on the thatched roof.

A homeowner with a sense of humor. This is a small statue of a cat on the thatched roof.

Chawton farmlands

Chawton farmlands

I actually stayed in the next village over, Alton, which was important in the English Civil War. I saw a house that said Oliver Cromwell had stayed there. I refrained from spitting on it. Cromwell was the leader of the Parliamentarians during the Civil War. A staunch Puritan, he became the Lord High Protector of England after King Charles I was deposed. Though I’m not actually a royalist—how could I be as an American?—I’m no fan of Cromwell. Anyone who knows Irish history knows his bloody legacy in that other land of my ancestors, the place most of them came from.

Years ago, I was teaching 17th century literature in New York City, and as a piece of “color” commentary while covering literature from the Cromwell years, I mentioned that many Irish still hate him and will spit when he’s mentioned. After a weekend, a young man came to me, amazed, and said, “Professor, I went to an Irish bar this weekend, and just to check, I told some people we were reading about Cromwell in class. And Professor! They spit on the floor!” For full effect, please read that story with an old-time Brooklyn accent.

I’ve already posted pictures of the pretty Norman church. My inn was also an old coaching inn. If you’re ever in Alton, stay at The Crown. The food was delicious, the room was comfy and the people there were friendly, accommodating and just a joy. When I picked up my luggage—the dreaded 10 ton suitcase and carryon—the owner himself drove me to the train station as it was “too hot” to walk. Such a true kindness will never be forgotten. When I go back, and I will go back, I will stay there even longer.

The Crown Hotel, Alton, Hampshire, UK

The Crown Hotel, Alton, Hampshire, UK

Later:

Finally made it to my London “home,” the student apartments of King’s College, London. Very similar to the Edinburgh set-up, but much noisier as it’s London! Also, it’s on the south bank, and I’ve never stayed on this side of the Thames before.

One exhausted traveler, so hope you enjoy the photos!

The Thames facing St. Paul's Cathedral

The Thames facing St. Paul’s Cathedral

The Globe Theatre

The Globe Theatre

Looking over the Thames

Looking over the Thames

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Good-bye Scotland

July 8—Travel Day

Sorry for yesterday’s lackluster entry, but I was tired and overwhelmed. So much natural beauty takes it right out of me, but I wanted to write something down while the impressions were fresh.

Today is a travel day—train from Edinburgh to London, then switching stations to get the train to Hampshire, the whole purpose of this trip. I’m actually in the UK for a scholarly conference at Chawton House Library, a marvelous place. For the next few days, entries will be sparse. While I am thrilled to be attending, I do understand that 17th-19th century theatre scholarship isn’t to everyone’s taste.

I bid a sad farewell to Scotland this morning.

Farewell, Scotland

Farewell, Scotland

I really wish I didn’t have to leave. Ever. But that’s not happening! There are pesky things like visas and work permits and jobs that need to be dealt with. To be honest, I apply for jobs in the UK all the time, but I never even get looked at. I tell myself it’s the visa situation. Of course, it could be that I’m not an interesting candidate, but I will pretend it’s the visa situation. Cést la vie.

Because I booked my trains so far ahead, I got some very good prices, so good that I treated myself to a first class ticket for the south-bound journey. Food and drink are included in the price, as is free wi-fi, so actually a wise investment. I do recommend it if only once. Seats are also bigger and more comfortable.

Before I arrived, I was looking forward to the scenery, which is stunning, but so far, very familiar. It looks like home.

Later: In Yorkshire now, so things are looking much different. Thinking of the Bronte sisters, of course. Not the biggest fan of Emily, but enjoy Anne and adore Charlotte. While in Bath, I felt a pressing need to read some Jane Austen; then in Edinburgh I wanted to read some Ian Rankin. Now a little Jane Eyre wouldn’t go amiss.

Rainy Yorkshire through a train window

Rainy Yorkshire through a train window

Much later: Have arrived in my little village near the library. The wifi on the train was dodgy to say the least, and the train to here was a commuter train, so crowded. Arrived, checked into my inn and asked for a Boots. But seems this village closes at 5:30! I was hoping for 6:00 as I would have made that. There is a supermarket nearby, so I walked to that and made do.

Pretty village

Pretty village

Took a little stroll around the village and found a picturesque Norman church. Didn’t go inside, of course, as it was too late, but the churchyard was pretty. Pretty little 17th century houses still around, though, of course the village must be much older based on the church.

A lovely Norman church

A lovely Norman church

I love quirky churchyards

I love quirky churchyards

Returned to the inn for a supper, and after updating this, I really think I’m down for the count. Too much bustling the past few days and need to be fresh tomorrow!

Took a snap while waiting for food

Took a snap while waiting for food

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The Highlands

July 7, 2015—Highlands Tour

Got up very early to catch the bus for the Highlands trip to Loch Ness. I’m exhausted, but want to get some impressions down.

First stop, a whisky distillery and tour. It smelled delicious, and I did learn a lot about whisky making. We had to wait till 10AM for our taste as that’s the law. It felt a little odd to be tasting whisky so early, but it was only a wee nip.

Unloading the used bourbon barrels imported from the US

Unloading the used bourbon barrels imported from the US

Their description of their product sounded lovely, but I didn’t buy any afterward. I do enjoy a nice single malt, but this place did not use peat, and I think I missed it. But glad I tried it.

Grinder installed in 1966 and still ticking along beautifully.

Grinder installed in 1966 and still ticking along beautifully.

The river outside the distillery that provides the electricity and the water used in the whisky

The river outside the distillery that provides the electricity and the water used in the whisky

The Highlands are beautiful, but they reminded me very strongly of home and places I’ve lived in the States. Much of the trip reminded me of the Hudson Valley where I grew up, which is part of the Appalachian mountain range, and other parts reminded me of the Adirondacks further north. I can certainly understand why Scottish settlers homesteaded in the northern Appalachians near where I grew up, but also in the southern part, which today is more commonly known as Appalachia.

Rainy day views

Rainy day views

I’ve spent time in the Smokies, as well, and yes, it was all familiar.

They are beautiful to be sure

They are beautiful to be sure

Later on during the boat tour, the commentary said that once North America and the UK were the same land mass but the split, and the Appalachian and the Caledonian mountain ranges originally being one. The Scandinavian mountains were part of this, as well, and at times during today’s trip I felt very much as if I were in Sweden again.

Mountain wildflowers

Mountain wildflowers

So while I have never been to Scotland before, I truly felt at home up in the Highlands. The architecture was different, and the temperatures lower, but very, very familiar.

Comforting site for me

Comforting sight for me

During my life, I have come to realize that I’m not very happy going too long without seeing mountains. I’ve rarely lived without them, but during my time in Dubai, I missed them very much. I lived in a flat part of Sweden, but we got the chance to at least see very large hills regularly. I’ve lived between the Alps and the Juras of Europe, near the mountains of Taipei, and crossed the American Rockies, but the mountains of the East Coast are the ones I love the best. And now I can say the Highlands fall into the love best category.

Beauty

Beauty

The boat ride on Loch Ness was total tourist. I wasn’t planning on taking it, but the tour guide said if you’re going this far, you should take the boat. It was nice, but I should have gone with my first instincts. It reminded me of touring Lake George, NY, by boat or even Lake Geneva, which are both larger than Loch Ness. Sometimes it was just like the lakes I grew up around. On the other hand, a boat ride is a boat ride. It was brisk weather, so I was thrilled. I’ve missed brisk terribly.

The famous Loch Ness

The famous Loch Ness

On the way back we stopped at a pretty little village for a break. It caters to tourists who are stopping either on the way up or the way down.

Quaint buildings

Quaint buildings

I love the architecture

I love the architecture

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